675 The Meaning of God’s Trials and Refinement of Man

1 The work of refinement is primarily to perfect people’s faith and in the end reach a state where you want to leave but you cannot, where some people are bereft of a shred of hope but they still have their faith, where people no longer have hope in their own future, and only at this time will God’s refinement conclude. Mankind still has not reached the stage of hovering between life and death—they have not tasted death, so the refinement is not at an end. Even those who were at the step of service-doers had not been refined to the utmost, but Job had been, with nothing to rely on. People must undergo refinements to the point that they have no hope and nothing to rely on—only then are they truly refinements.


2 Undergoing the trials of Job is also undergoing the trials of Peter. When Job was tested he stood witness, and in the end Jehovah was revealed to him. Only after he stood witness was he worthy of seeing the face of God. Why is it said: “I hide from the land of filth but show Myself to the holy kingdom”? That means that only when you are holy and stand witness can you have the dignity to see the face of God. If you cannot stand witness for Him, you do not have the dignity to see His face. If you retreat or complain against God in the face of refinements, failing to stand witness for Him and being Satan’s laughing stock, you will not gain the appearance of God.


Adapted from “Those Who Are to Be Made Perfect Must Undergo Refinement” in The Word Appears in the Flesh

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