504 The Path of Successful Faith in God

1 The destinations of Paul and Peter were measured according to whether they could perform their duty as creatures of God, and not according to the size of their contribution; their destinations were determined according to that which they sought from the beginning, not according to how much work they did, or other people’s estimation of them. And so, seeking to actively perform one’s duty as a creature of God is the path to success; seeking the path of a true love of God is the most correct path; seeking changes in one’s old disposition, and a pure love of God, is the path to success.

2 Such a path to success is the path of the recovery of the original duty as well as the original appearance of a creature of God. It is the path of recovery, and is also the aim of all of God’s work from beginning to end. If the pursuit of man is tainted with personal extravagant demands and irrational longings, then the effect that is achieved will not be changes in man’s disposition. This is at odds with the work of recovery. It is undoubtedly not work done by the Holy Spirit, and so proves that pursuit of this kind is not approved of by God. What significance has pursuit that is not approved of by God?

Adapted from “Success or Failure Depends on the Path That Man Walks” in The Word Appears in the Flesh

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