302 People Regard Christ as an Ordinary Man

Verse 1

All wish to see the true face of Jesus;

all desire to be with Him.

Each brother and sister would wish

to see or be with Jesus.

Before you’ve seen Jesus, the incarnate God,

you’d assume His look and way of life.

But once you’ve really seen Him,

your ideas will swiftly change.


Verse 2

Man’s thoughts can’t be overlooked,

but man can’t change Christ’s essence.

You think of Christ as an immortal or a sage,

not as normal with divinity.

Many who yearn day and night

to see God are His enemies,

discordant with Him.

Is this not man’s own mistake?


Verse 3

Many who contact Christ fail,

playing the role of the Pharisees,

because in their notions, God is lofty,

worthy of admiration.

But the truth is not as man wishes.

Not only is Christ not lofty,

not only is Christ human,

but He’s small, ordinary.


Bridge

He can’t ascend to heaven,

or move about on earth freely.

So man treats Him like a normal man,

speaking casually and lightly.

All the while, they wait for

the coming of the “true Christ.”

Christ has already come

and He has uttered words.


Verse 4

Yet you take this man

and you take His words

as someone ordinary,

as something commonplace.

Because of this, you’ve not received

anything from Christ,

instead exposed your ugliness to the light.


Adapted from “Those Who Are Incompatible With Christ Are Surely Opponents of God” in The Word Appears in the Flesh

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Next: 303 Do You Have True Faith in Christ?

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