671 What Man Should Hold to During Trials

1 For every step of God’s work, there is a way that people should cooperate. God refines people so that they have confidence in the midst of refinements. God perfects people so that they have confidence to be perfected by God and are willing to accept His refinements and being dealt with and pruned by God. The Spirit of God works within people to bring them enlightenment and illumination, and to have them cooperate with Him and practice. God does not speak during refinements. He does not utter His voice, but there is still the work that people should do. You should uphold what you already have, you should still be able to pray to God, be close to God, and stand witness in front of God; this way you will fulfill your own duty.

2 All of you should see clearly from God’s work that His trials of people’s confidence and love require that they pray more to God, and that they savor God’s words in front of Him more often. You must clearly see what duty it is that people should fulfill. You may not know what God’s will actually is, but you can perform your duty, you can pray when you should, you can put the truth into practice when you should, and you can do what people ought to do. You can uphold your original vision. This way, you will be more able to accept God’s next step of work.

Adapted from “You Should Maintain Your Devotion to God” in The Word Appears in the Flesh

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